The Contributions of Writer and Scotland Soldier Alastair Borthwick

Alastair Borthwick left behind his famous literature works and a part of Scotland’s history during World War II. The former legendary author and media broadcaster devoted years serving and fighting for his country leaving behind memories of his experiences. Borthwick was born in Rutherglen, Lanarkshire and at age 11 moved with his family to Glasgow to start a new life. When he was 16 years of age, his first job was working for Evening Times as a copy-taker, front page writer, and puzzle creator. According to The Guardian, he was responsible for writing responses to readers, letters to the editor, and pages for films.

By the time Alastair Borthwick turned 26 years old, he had a book published, Always A Little Further detailing his rock climbing experience. He wrote about climbing rocks in hills of Scotland with realistic story characters, action, and laughter. Faber and Faber published the book in the 1930s. In the mid-1930s, Borthwick joined London’s Daily Mirror working for a year. His stay with the company didn’t last long before going to Empire Exhibition working the press club. (Medium.com)

Soon after, Alastair Borthwick wanted to explore radio broadcasting and worked for BBC discussing topics on Scotland and outdoor adventures. He eventually joined the service to serve and protect his country resulting in a promotion to battalion intelligence officer and captain. His contribution to the service include successfully leading the battalion which comprises 600 soldiers. It was during the WWII in Sicily, Europe, and the Western Desert when he was with the Fifth Seaforth, a division of 51st Highlanders.

John Sym relieved Alastair of his duties to write about the battalion ultimate days of crusading, in 1946. His writings became a book, Sans Peur in the 1940s and renamed in the 1980s and 1990s to Battalion. When his time ends in the service, Alastair Borthwick moved in a small cottage off the coast of Jura with his wife. At age 90, he passed away leaving behind his children, wife and literature about outdoor adventures of rock climbing and serving Scotland as Captain leader of fighters in the world war.

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